Black Lives Matter – Taking a Stand From Home

Once more, the world is in a state of political unrest. Alongside the virus, there are protests happening worldwide supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. If, like me, you are unable to go out and protest, I can assure you there are ways you can support the movement. Hopefully, if we all continue to unite as we are currently, we can make this world a safe place for all – not just certain races. If you know anymore ideas or have any advice to give, please comment it. It’s about time we made some change around here and it is important that we are all as educated as possible on the matters at hand.

If you are unaware of the situation in America currently, there are protests taking place over the murder of George Floyd and the punishment of the policeman responsible for his death. These protests have begun to spread around the world and if you want to do something to show your support for the movement but are paranoid about leaving your house due to… other events, I have compiled a list of things you can do to help while staying safe and home.

  1. Remember their names. As unfortunate and horrific as it is, George Floyd is not the first instance of police brutality to a person of colour. It is so important that we remember all those who have lost their lives simply because of the colour of their skin. It’s dumfounding how many victims there are, but it’s just all the more proof that this should have been changed a long time ago. We can’t change the past, but we can at least change the future.
  2. Sign petitions. Change.org have so many petitions about this movement and it is a well trusted website which will – quite frankly – get shit done. It’s such a quick, simplistic way to make a difference and I assure you, you’ll feel so much better after you’ve done it. Sign up for updates and you can sign even more petitions.
  3. Be respectful to all those around you and the victims friends and family. Such an important one. This is definitely not the time to start an all out race war. This is the time of political movement and change. This is not the time to claim all white people have a superiority complex or that all cops are racist. This just gets you no-where and you have no evidence for your facts. Don’t accuse someone of something they have not done. We need to learn to spread love and not hate, the sooner the better.
  4. Educate yourselves. I understand that everyone has differing views on this whole protest and that’s okay, you just need to remember to learn and back up your points. If you have a differing view it’s important to educate and learn as much as you can about the situation before forming an opinion.
  5. Buy from black-owned companies and support small businesses and avoid buying from companies just profiting of others struggle. Lots of big name brands are unfortunately using this time to profit off of the racism in the world. If you want to support, yet again educate yourself on which companies you should avoid. Buying and supporting from black owned companies is a step in the right direction towards acceptance and equality.
  6. Call people out on their racist behaviour and educate them. Lots of people make jokes. That’s fine! However, some people cross the line and their “jokes” are plain offensive. It’s important that if you see a joke or comment that makes you uncomfortable, spread the word that what they’ve said or done isn’t acceptable.
  7. Boycott racist companies and influencers. In this day in age lots of companies and people are being exposed for their racist ways. The only way we can show these people and companies that it’s not okay is by not buying or promoting their products until they change their ways.
  8. Speak up and speak out If you have had a negative experience involving your race, get your story heard and share it. The more people who speak up, the better as it shows the government and those in charge that this is an actual problem.
  9. Donate to charities and causes. Yet again you’ll need to do your research, but donating as little as £1 can go a long way and you can help change the future. If you are unable to donate, then share and spread the message to show we stand together.
  10. Attending protests. I am aware this isn’t easy at all, but if you can, try your best to show up to show your support. Make sure you stay safe and healthy and go do your part.

This time isn’t easy for anyone. If we try spread support and love and raise awareness, hopefully our voices will be heard and the world will change for the better.

This is a time that will go down in history, you just need to stay safe and support others.

All the love,

Tati xx

Why I’m a Feminist

Welcome to feminist Friday’s!  Where (almost) every Friday I talk about all thing’s female empowerment and equality!  This week I need everyone to know why I’m a feminist…

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that baby to grow up with gender roles about how boys don’t cry.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that toddler to grow up thinking she needs to wait for a prince to save her.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that four-year-old to grow up being told a boy is being mean to her because he likes her.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that six-year-old to grow up being told she can’t achieve her dreams of being a sporting star because she’s a girl.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that eight-year-old to grow up hearing grown men sexualising her body because her “shorts are too short”.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that ten-year-old to grow up feeling self-conscious about her stomach size, her boob size, or her butt size.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that twelve-year-old to grow up with the trauma and PTSD of sexual assault and harassment.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that fourteen-year-old to grow up without any form of education about consent.

I’m a feminist because I want to grow up in a world of equality and love.

I’m a feminist because I want to grow up and not be afraid of walking alone or worrying who’s lurking around the corner.

I’m a feminist because I want equal pay.

I’m a feminist because I want abuse to end.

I’m a feminist because some day I want to be up for a job promotion against a man with a similar skillset as I do and for neither of us to be discriminated against (positive or otherwise).

I’m a feminist because I’ve been waiting for the world to change my whole life.  Now it’s time to make the world change.

Voting Age – Tati Talks

Politics is shambles. You don’t really know what’s going on and neither do the leaders for about four years but then you blink and suddenly everyone’s having Brexit parties for some reason or another. There’s always some sort of non-political politics related scandal about an MP being a not-so-secret bigot or a US presidential candidate being accused of some horrific act which makes your blood boil. But hey! That’s politics! What a world we live in am I right? So, now I have stated my ever increasingly controversial opinion on politics, might as well go right to the deep end and talk about UK General elections voting age.

Figure One

Looking over these rules, overall, I don’t really have an issue with them, except for one. That one is the age. I have such strong opinions on it, I wrote a whole essay on it in my Year 10 mock citizenship exam. It was an 8 Mark question and I wrote well over two pages (I did get full marks though which is cool). So, to reiterate my point but to a larger audience, I think the voting age should be lowered from 18 to 16. There are so many reasons, but I am here to discuss a small three with you. Please comment your opinions below, I love hearing from people, and I love debates! DISCLAIMER: for many of these points I will be using hyperboles, and so even though the facts are true (I’ll leave the links I used at the bottom of this article) my opinion may be exaggerated to prove the point – debates must do. This is a controversial subject but I am not one to shy away and so I am going to face this head on. I mean no disrespect to anyone; these are just my thoughts and feelings.


Firstly, I think that the voting age should be lowered because anyone who is registered as a UK citizen can vote, and those under 18 are UK Citizens also. This includes perpetrators like those who have committed heinous acts against society. So, if we are giving permission to serial killers to express their freedom, why can’t we allow innocent 16-year olds to express their basic human rights to freedom and expression? (Article 19 – Universal Declaration of Human Rights). At this point, it begs the question, is this just a basic act of human decency Britain, or is it a deprivation of the human rights that we get taught about as soon as we start school?
Statistically, people do not want young people to vote because they feel there is no point as the voter turnout will not be affected. This is a valid concern since in 2017 43% of 18-19-year olds did not vote in the general election. This is staggering compared to the fact that a mere 16% of over 70-year-olds did not vote. However, the reason why so many young people did not vote is because they did not understand the concept. They were not fully educated on the matters which meant they did not understand what the difference between voting for lib-dems or the conservatives would make. There is a simple solution to this “conundrum”: We educate the younger generation on voting – we explain how to vote, why their vote matters, all the different parties, left-wing vs right-wing etc. Not only does this make young people more prepared for their future and make them more well-rounded individuals, but it also makes the voter turnout greater, meaning that Britain will be a true democracy with equal amounts of different demographics voting.

If we look at the laws that sixteen-year olds hold, they are very questionable and at some points controversial. The laws a sixteen-year-old hold are shown in figure 2:

Figure Two

Many of these laws are very controversial and would raise a few eyebrows. Furthermore, when you are aged thirteen, you are told you must choose your GCSE options, something which greatly shapes your future. The fact we are giving young people this control, but not to choose something which greatly shapes the future of this country is definitely wrong.
In conclusion, I think we should lower the voting age from eighteen to sixteen because it is the young peoples future, it gives them good life skills for the future and it increases the chances of an equal democracy.
Thank you for reading, please like this post if you enjoyed it, comment your views and opinions on this topic and follow this blog if you want to see more about what I write 🙂


xo baby, Tati xoxo

REFERENCE LINKS:
http://www.youthoria.org/home/life/rights/what-can-i-do/1238766403.391/
https://www.gov.uk/elections-in-the-uk
https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2017/06/13/how-britain-voted-2017-general-election