What If… I Was A Man For The Day?

What if… I was a dude for the day? This is a question my friend and I… Who I shall call Sonic, ask each other loads. For context, Sonic identifies and a male and he wonders what it would be like to be a woman.

We ask each other this loads, because we have ideas, certain thoughts about stereotypical gender roles and we’d both love to trade ends of the spectrum just for a day and see how differently we’d be treated. To be completely honest, I think Sonic is just infatuated with the thought of having boobs and I’m the same, but for… oh God, my parents are going to kill me, and my grandparents – I’m so sorry guys…. and I’m the same, I want to know what it’d be like to have a penis. Come on though, peeing standing up?! That sounds pretty magical if I’m honest with you.

One of my biggest questions for guys is, how does the world see you? If you’re a woman, your one goal in life is to be a gorgeous trophy wife, but what if you’re told you have to be the breadwinning husband? Are there sets of rules you have to obey when you’re a male, I know that toxic gender roles prevail with both genders, but what is the mould for a “real man”?

I just think it must be so bizarre to not have to panic about leaving the house alone, not worrying about being scrutinised about every little idiosyncrasy you posses, not having to feel intensely judged for the clothes you wear or how much makeup you apply.

What’s it like to not be sexualised on the daily? Not having to freak out whenever you hear footsteps behind you or having to walk with your keys in your hands as self-defence, just in case?

I’d love to have friends and class mates ask about me and my life instead of if I’ve found a boyfriend yet or what happened with so-and-so.

I don’t know. I have so many theories on how men are less judged, but I’m sure that’s not true. I would like to know, just for one day, see the world through a man’s perspective.

Why Malala Yousafzai Inspires Me

For most of these articles, I need to think long and hard about my answer. However, this one came to my head without even really thinking. By far the person I look up to the most and who I hope I will meet someday is Malala Yousafzai.

When I was around 10 or 11, the book I Am Malala came out. I was in year six at the time and I didn’t know much about this woman. What I read changed my life forever.

For those of you who don’t know, Malala Yousafzai is a 23-year-old activist who spoke out against the Taliban, a radical terrorist group in Pakistan when she was only 10 years old. In an a futile attempt to silence her, she was shot in the head when she was twelve when she was on her way home from school. Being the strong person she was, she survived and managed to become the youngest Nobel Prize Laureate ever.

After reading her book, I completely re-evaluated my thoughts and feelings about so many things. Firstly, this is the book that really made me realise I was a feminist and that I wanted to change the world, and Malala made me realise I could do it. Her sheer power and resistance is something I will never stop talking about and I always hope that she knows she changed my life for the better. Secondly, she made me proud to be mixed race. Some of you have read my post about my Ethnicity, in which I spoke about Liza Koshy inspiring me to be proud about my skin colour. However, a mini turning point for me was reading this book. This strong woman who was Pakistani was standing up for what she believed in, and refused to let anyone silence her. Even after she was in fatal condition, she never stopped fighting for equality and for education for all.

This woman is such an inspiration and has shaped me to become who I am today and I desperately hope that one day I’ll be able to meet her, just to say thank you for helping me to accept myself and begin to become my best self.

I’m sorry this was rather brief, Malala is one of my biggest role models and I want people to understand that! Also, as I was writing this, I accidentally went down a bit of a Yousafzai-Spiral and it really made me realise how truly grounded this woman is, in one article I read she said all she needs right now is Netflix and Sleep and, honestly, who doesn’t! I think we can all agree that Ms Yousafzai is an absolute icon and inspiration to all young women in this world.

“If one man can destroy everything, why can’t one girl change it?”

Malala Yousafzai

Why Taylor Swift Is The Definition of a Fearless Leader and an Alpha Type

Taylor Swift’s Lover album shows she’s determined to ...

Once upon a time, I was around my friend’s house and we were being ten-year-olds, messing around.  My friend said there was a song a singer had released, and I had to listen to it.  She said it was by Taylor Swift.  Of course, I’d heard of the Miss Americana singer before, but I’d never watched her music videos.  My friend showed me the iconic Blank Space music video and ever since then I was a Swiftie.

A few months later, I was in Bristol with my family and we were at the shopping mall Cribbs Causeway and I found the 1989 Album.  My Dad caved and bought me the album and that was when my obsession began.

It’s not just because Taylor Swift is a good singer, she’s an amazing person too and through her actions and listening to her music which made me a stronger person when I needed to be.  Two particular events she helped me through were life changing and no matter what happens, I know her music will be there to help me and raise me up when I really need it.

The first thing was the DJ David Muller V Taylor Swift groping trial.  If you are unaware of this, long story short, Muller groped Swift at a meet and greet, and, after Swift spoke to his employees (KYGO) he was fired.  This happened in 2013 and it finally got sorted out in 2017 – when I began getting assaulted.  Hearing about how confidently Swift spoke about in the trial and how she managed to win the case for just $1 changed my way of thinking entirely and made me realise what this particular person was doing to me was not okay.  Listening to her music made me realise that all the things that my abuser was tearing me down about were completely insane and that, for once in my life, I felt normal and accepted.  When Reputation came out, my “friends” hated it, but I adored it.  All the songs resonated with me in such a way and made me begin to accept myself.  The lyrics were all about backstabbers and people pretending to be something they’re not and those few people who are there for you are gorgeous and amazing.  Whenever I need a little pick-me-up I always blast Reputation and dramatically sing along to Look What You Made Me Do, Getaway Car and This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things – it’s very cathartic and I always leave me room feeling like a total boss-ass-bitch – which I am!

The second time Taylor Swift supported me through songs was with my breakup with my abusive boyfriend.  That break up hit me hard, but through some of her iconic songs and (some underrated songs) I realised that “I would find someone someday who might actually treat me well”.  Not only did they help me get over this guy, but they also made me feel more confident in myself and I’ll never forget the days I just spent belting out Taylor Swift lyrics until I felt that I was “finally clean”.

All in all, Taylor Swift is one of my biggest inspirations of all time and everything she does is honestly iconic.  From the #drunktaylor memes circulating Twitter, to her just casually donating to amazing charities just because she wants to, to her loving relationship with her mother, to her being so brutally honest in her documentary Miss Americana.  No matter what your opinions are on her, I feel we can all agree she is an icon, legend and star.

Why I’m a Feminist

Welcome to feminist Friday’s!  Where (almost) every Friday I talk about all thing’s female empowerment and equality!  This week I need everyone to know why I’m a feminist…

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that baby to grow up with gender roles about how boys don’t cry.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that toddler to grow up thinking she needs to wait for a prince to save her.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that four-year-old to grow up being told a boy is being mean to her because he likes her.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that six-year-old to grow up being told she can’t achieve her dreams of being a sporting star because she’s a girl.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that eight-year-old to grow up hearing grown men sexualising her body because her “shorts are too short”.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that ten-year-old to grow up feeling self-conscious about her stomach size, her boob size, or her butt size.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that twelve-year-old to grow up with the trauma and PTSD of sexual assault and harassment.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that fourteen-year-old to grow up without any form of education about consent.

I’m a feminist because I want to grow up in a world of equality and love.

I’m a feminist because I want to grow up and not be afraid of walking alone or worrying who’s lurking around the corner.

I’m a feminist because I want equal pay.

I’m a feminist because I want abuse to end.

I’m a feminist because some day I want to be up for a job promotion against a man with a similar skillset as I do and for neither of us to be discriminated against (positive or otherwise).

I’m a feminist because I’ve been waiting for the world to change my whole life.  Now it’s time to make the world change.