10 Double Standards Males and Females Face

Before I start writing this article, I just want to let you all know, I didn’t write this alone! My boyfriend came up with this idea and then also helped me with some of the main points I’m making. So, don’t thank me, thank him. Now, on with the post!♥️✨


Being alive on earth is tough. I think we can all agree that each of us have face at least some hardship whilst existing on this earth. But, one of the most constant issues both males and females face is the issue of double standards.

The Cambridge English Dictionary defines double standard as “a rule or standard of good behaviour that, unfairly, some people are expected to follow or achieve but other people are not“.

Whether you want to admit it or not, every single one of us has faced a double standard. The only way for these ridiculous ideals to end is by calling them out and explaining why they are wrong. So, here I am for you today, calling out all these standards. I hope you will join me in explaining why they are wrong, calling them out, and even adding double standards which you or someone you know has faced.


  1. When women have sex, they’re classified as “whores” or “sluts”, but when men do it they’re seen as “players” and it’s seen as a positive.

Possibly one of the most well known double standards, dating back to the beginning of time. It most likely started because of religious beliefs of pre-marital sex and all that jazz, but I will never understand exactly why men could get away with it but women were scrutinised. It makes no sense, it shouldn’t happen, as long as it’s consensual then it’s fine. I’m a strong advocate for sex positivity – this is a very controversial thing, hence why I am here to ensure you know that it’s okay!

2. Boys can’t cry or talk about their feelings – whilst girls are encouraged to do so.

Whilst it’s always hard to reach out when you are struggling with your mental health, toxic masculinity is the reason many men struggle to say they are struggling. Due to unnecessary ideals of what it takes to be a ‘real man’, many guys feel like they cannot say how they really feel as they’d be considered weak, which is completely untrue. A brand which I have watched grow from simply an idea on an Instagram account to their extreme popularity now is Boys Get Sad Too. Its aim is to raise awareness and to start the conversation about men’s mental health by selling thought provoking products.

3. Girls can show affection and be tactile to their friends, but when guys do it they get ridiculed and called “gay”

Yet another toxic masculinity ideal which is crazy. If you appreciate your friends, you should let them know! No matter your gender, show appreciation for those you love! And, if you are gay, it’s not a bad thing! Anyone who says it is, they’re wrong and uneducated and pay them no mind.

4. Boys can hit a girl – when play fighting – and they’ll be known as a “woman abuser”, but when girls are abusive to their boyfriends, no-one seems to really care.

A large amount of double standards which men face stem from toxic masculinity and the whole idea that “boys don’t cry”. This one irks me. Boys and girls can both get abused. They’re not weak because it happens, it’s a horrific thing to happen, no matter who you are, and if someone is brave enough to speak up about it, you should support them, not scrutinise or attack. They’ve been through enough, give them the respect that the monster who hurt them didn’t.

5. When a boy dates a girl in the year above, he’s “pulling”, but if she’s in the year below, it’s creepy.

As long as it’s consensual and they are both of age then it’s fine, and if not, they do nothing sexual until they are over 16. It’s a strange one and it only really happens in secondary schools. The best thing to do is to simply ignore them, they’re annoying kids who are bored.

6. Men don’t get raped, and if they do, they get ridiculed.

There are (completely incorrect) beliefs that men should be strong enough to fight their rapist off. It’s insane and it’s similar to the belief that guys can’t get abused. Just stop it. If someone has been sexually abused, support, don’t shame, it is really that simple.

7. If a woman dates someone younger than her, than he’s a “boy toy”, but if the man is older, than she’s a “gold digger”

Example ages: 25 and 60. The woman will always get scrutinised when in a relationship with an age gap. Yet again, as long as it’s consensual and healthy, there is no point in being hateful. If you’re happy with them, and it’s a legal age gap, go for it!!

8. Teacher student relationships get covered differently in the media, depending on what gender the teacher is.

If it is a female teacher, then the victim is meant to be considered “lucky” as it is a common sexual fantasy, whilst if it is a male teacher then the victim is presented as being manipulated and abused (which is the truth). Media coverage will say things like “boy, 15, slept with teacher, 25″ when the teacher is a woman, but if the teacher is a male they will say “girl, 15, manipulated into sleeping with teacher, 25″. It’s messed up, and both genders of teachers should be called out for being manipulative and abusing their power.

9. Tomboys are way more acceptable than tomgirls

From clothes to the way they’re able to act and also the things they do/play with, women are far more accepted if they’re a little bit more ‘masculine’. If anything, in the current day, it’s encouraged. STEM subjects now all try their hardest to employ more women, using positive discrimination. However, if you are a male who is interested in more ‘feminine’ activities, then toxic masculinity comes into play and a boy is likely to be bullied for playing with Barbies and makeup.

10. Guys can talk about sex graphically, but people are disgusted when girls do it

There’s a specific bs list of expectations of women, and this one is just under “women aren’t funny”. It’s completely messed up, and it’s a double standard which perfectly circles back to my first point. Sex is such a heavily stigmatised thing, there are so many misconceptions which lead to people getting hurt and things like the fact that girls shouldn’t speak about sex simply add to it.

Not All Men, But All Women: A Discussion

Finally, we’re having the discussion I’ve been trying to start for years now, it’s just a shame that an innocent woman had to die in order for this to begin.  I want to start by giving a disclaimer that this article will have strong language, talk about mature themes such as sexual assault and rape, and it’s just generally not suitable for younger audiences or people who get distressed when reading the topics, I will be bringing up.  Your safety is the most important thing.  I also want to say that I mean absolutely no disrespect to anyone, I am simply here to explain what is going on and so are those I spoke to. 

About a week after the discussion of women’s safety became extremely present on mainstream media, I knew I had to talk about it 

What’s going on at the moment, how it’s affecting people, I speak about this so much, I decided to get more people to talk about it and include my input to the situation.  However, I soon realised, I have done this sort of thing a lot.  Some examples can be seen herehere and here.  Since I write about this so much, I decided to ✨spice things up✨ and I asked a favour from some of my friends.

I wrote up different questions in a questionnaire and I got them to answer them honestly, and I’ve put them all here!

To make this a fair test, I didn’t give them any of my input before or during them answering the questions, made each of the questions the same, and told them it would be totally confidential. 

For certain answers I have received, I may crop or leave out/slightly edit some questions.  Not the overall message, I’m just going to ensure they are not too long or reiterate similar things which have already been stated.

I asked seventeen different people, and I have changed their names to protect their identities. I just want to say a huge thank you to those who did this for me, it means so much and I am so grateful to know people as incredible as you guys, especially considering I don’t always speak to you all that frequently.

The sixteen people I have chosen are essentially the future. They are 16-17 year olds, we all went to the same secondary school and now all attend college/sixth form. I know this isn’t a diverse mix, but this doesn’t make what they say any less important. The lovely people who helped me are:

  1. James, 17, male
  2. Daniel, 17, male 
  3. Elizabeth, 16, female 
  4. Avis, 17 
  5. Bailey, 16 
  6. Andrew, 16, male 
  7. George, male 
  8. Teresa, 17, female 
  9. Jason, 17, male 
  10. Ryan, 17, male
  11. Betty, 16, female 
  12. Amelia, 16, female
  13. Jeffree, 17, male 
  14. Ana, 17, female
  15. Brent, 16, male 
  16. Harper, 16, female 

Now, after that extremely long introduction, here is the Q&A I had with those sixteen people ❤


  • Do you feel safe walking alone?

James – Yes

Daniel – I do for the most part. If it’s late and I’m on my own I feel a bit sketched out. Generally, I’m always cautious but I’m not scared.

Eliza – Not really, but I guess it would differ depending on the situation.

Avis – When I am with a group of people especially guy friends, I do feel safe but, when I am alone, I don’t always feel safe.

Bailey – No strong answer, as I don’t walk alone very much.

Andrew – Depends – usually on time and area.  

Teresa – No 

Jason – No 

Ryan – I feel safe walking home by myself most of the time but not late at night

Betty – No 

Amelia – No, especially not at night. 

Jeffree – Yes 

Ana – no, not at all

Harper – no I don’t feel safe when walking alone, especially at night

Brent – I don’t feel unsafe unless it is dark. [still wary though]


  • Do you worry about the safety of the women you care about? 

James – I do

Daniel – Absolutely.  I always worry about them

Eliza – I do yes

Avis – Definitely. When walking home from school or after hanging out with friends and having to go separate ways home I [think] I should probably walk my female friends all the way home just in case something happens. Which is horrible that I actually have to think about that.

Bailey – I do worry about them.

Andrew – Yes.  It’s a scary place for women with creepy men catcalling and things.

George – yes 

Teresa – yes 

Jason – Yes

Ryan – I absolutely care about the safety of the women I care about.

Betty – yes 

Amelia – Yes definitely 

Jeffree – Of course

Ana – yes, a lot 

Harper – I worry about pretty much any other women I know

Brent – yes


  • What do you think the government can do to ensure this gets better?

James – Spread more awareness about the subject as well as providing more in-depth information to young women and men about their safety.

Daniel – I think that there could be more foot police patrols around high-risk areas like alleys or secluded paths. But other than that, it comes down to people to not be pieces of shit.

Eliza – I don’t think it’s something that the government can fix. I also feel like a lot of the ideas that females would come up with, many men would feel are sexist.

Avis – Maybe if we can start trying to enforce this idea of “No means no” at schools earlier on things could change. We also need to get rid of this idea of “boys will be boys” and “she asked for it”. There are just so many toxic ideologies embedded into society from a young age.

Bailey – Rather than focusing everything on the female population, they should be finding a balance of resources, education and information for both women and men as to how they should be acting in situations such as these. And I honestly feel like the government need to be more open in discussions because they don’t seem to be as bothered with protecting women

Andrew – Maybe better lighting in the streets at night?  And/or harsher sentences as a deterrent.  If you rape someone and only get five years, that is an unfair sentence as the woman is affected for life

Teresa – Teach children better. Make sure people know the importance of consent, not only consent but enthusiastic consent and that anything less than yes means you should step away. Teach the importance of supporting people after going through that kind of experience.

Jason – I think they can and should put an emphasis on the safety and protection of women who are victims of assault of any kind, and they should try to keep an up-to-date list of people who have been reported for offences, and they should always talk to the parent of a young offender no matter what the offence.

Ryan – I believe more education is required and societal norms need to be shifted.

Amelia – I’m not particularly sure about what they can do because they can’t control the actions of each individual person.

Jeffree – I don’t believe the government can do anything. 

Ana – Make it legal for women to carry some sort of self-defence.

Harper – they need to work harder to educate boys on the issue and make me of an effort to prosecute for rapists and assaulters cause too many get away freely

Brent – honestly believe there is very little that the government could do that would help the issue. I think that feeling on edge and cautious is a good thing as it means you know when to keep yourself safe but when it comes to feeling in danger the only real thing that could solve that is stopping the people that cause this feeling.


  • Do you think women should have to go to any more safety precautions?

James – I don’t think women should have to in the first place

Daniel – women shouldn’t have to worry at all no matter what they’re doing or what they wear but the unfortunate reality is that some people make that impossible

Eliza – I don’t think that it is fair that females have to more careful when walking around in their own neighbourhood than what men have to.

Avis – I mean, there’s already so many different “precautions” women have to go through, I hope there isn’t more.

Bailey – Unfortunately, for women to be able to stay safe alone, they may have to which is really sad.

Andrew – I don’t think women should have to because they should feel as safe as a man should.  But during this time, it’s a good idea to take precautions such as rape alarms and things.

Teresa – Women are already doing enough, more than we should. 

Jason – No, I don’t and I feel as If they take too many already. They should never have to feel as unsafe as they do, and women should be able to feel as if they can leave the house without fear of being assaulted.

Ryan – I believe they should go to a level they feel comfortable with doing but it is disgusting that they should have to take any precautions in the first place

Betty – They need to, but they shouldn’t have to 

Amelia – Women already do everything that they can to keep themselves safe and recent events have proven that even that is apparently not enough. At this point the issue is not women not doing enough protect themselves, it’s the men (obvs not all) that feel that they are entitled to women’s bodies.

Jeffree – I feel they should have something to protect themselves if they are walking alone 

Ana – Yes, they should be able to carry some sort of protection just in case.

Harper – I don’t think it should be a women’s responsibility to put in any more effort than they already do

Brent – If the woman feels unsafe it isn’t their fault. I think that only men can really change this.


  • What can men do when walking to make women feel safer?

James – I don’t know what men could do to make women feel safer while walking, since the same would apply to women and what they could do to make some men feel safer while walking

Daniel – keep their distance, cross the road, go on the phone or just straight up go another way if it’s late and the woman is clearly nervous. I always feel so bad walking close to women on the street because I can tell they’re on edge and it is just so sad how our society is like that.

Avis – Although this goes out to women as well, if they see a woman being harassed on the street or looking very uncomfortable while talking to someone, going over and calmly helping the woman away from the situation, like pretending to be a friend and asking where they’ve been or something like that, could really save a life.

Bailey – I think for men, they really need to give up the whole macho thing. Sometimes trying to be all big and strong and protective of women doesn’t always get the right results we need and instead only makes people see women as weak

Andrew – Tough situation, similar to being a teenage boy, smile and wave politely, carry on with your day seems to calm people down and helps make people happy

Teresa – Cross the road, call a friend. Or at least not get annoyed when we do things to protect ourselves if they won’t.

Jason – Men can cross the road, or call someone, or should attempt to get ahead of women so they can feel safer.

Ryan – Men can keep the eyes and thoughts to themselves not everyone is there for you talk to complete what you’re doing without disrupting others also if you’re continually going in the same directions as someone change your route, so they feel safer

Amelia – Walk female friends’ home if it’s dark or dusk, cross the street/don’t get near to a woman you don’t know when they’re walking alone, please don’t catcall

Jeffree – Protect them making them feel safer

Ana – If their friends with the women just walk them home, but if their a strange cross the road and walk on the other side or walk slowly so they’re not close to the women.

Harper – educating themselves is a big one, and standing up for girls if they notice something bad happening, calling out their mates if they say something like make a joke, and making efforts to look unthreatening when walking near a girl, or like crossing the road or something

Brent – try to make sure you aren’t walking behind a woman. if you are then cross over to the other side of the road. or if this isn’t possible stop for a while to make good distance between you.


  • What are your thoughts on changing the curriculum in order to try avoiding these issues?

James – More information on the subject to educate men and women about their safety and ways to know when a situation could pose threat

Daniel – 100% schools should teach the subject just like they teach anything else. Don’t avoid the subject! People should learn how to behave.

Eliza – I think that during younger teenage years such as year 7 to 11 could have a topic about sexual crime would help to educate young people about the world that we live in and how we can avoid incidents

Avis – should be introduced taught about “no means no” and issues around it but maybe said in a more positive-reinforced setting and sprinkling the teaching of these kind attitudes throughout multiple lessons so it becomes the normal for the children?

Bailey – I think everyone needs to be educated in these types of topics. Because past generations were never opening about these types of things it’s left our generation to speak up about it and make changes so that we won’t have to see this again in the future

Andrew – Great idea, ensure consent is not “just a box ticking exercise”, it needs to be something important.

Teresa – I completely agree the curriculum should be changed. The argument that young people shouldn’t have sex and so shouldn’t be taught about those things is stupid. People will have sex at any age, and no one can stop them, they should just know the importance of consent and safety. And it’s not like when we get older the teachings around it changes.

Jason – We should change the curriculum, so consent and sexual assault is more important than it already is.

Ryan – I believe curriculum particularly in younger education needs drastic changes.  The first years of education the focus should be upon behaving as any decent person should

Betty – I think they should change it to better educate girls and boys about the reality of the world

Amelia – I think that schools should educate students more on these issues because it’s a very real and relevant problem.

Jeffree – something needs to change for people to feel safe

Ana – They could spend more time explaining it and showing documentaries.

Harper – I think they need to change the curriculum, education kids from a young age will help engrave it in their minds that this stuff is not okay

Brent – I think it is extremely important that schools educate us better on these issues.


  • What about false conviction rates? Fake rape claims? How do we avoid these miscarriages of justice?

James – I believe there are many women and men that will use fake rape claims to get what they want in selective situations; I believe the only way to ensure the avoidance of such claims would be by intensive investigation on both parties to understand the exact situation that took place

Daniel – The amount of fake rape claims is tiny in comparison to actual rape claims or rape that never goes reported. I think people who make fake rape claims, male or female, should be punished but it is by no means reason to Besmirch someone else’s claim.

Avis – Although it’s a very small percentage compared to true convictions, it is still a big issue and one used to put down women who have been raped so that the rapists get off easy. I have no idea what can be done of this issue, but I hope we can find one soon.

Bailey – I have a specific thing to say about false accusations and claims and it’s tied with how, despite things are now being talked about, stigma is still around and there’s now the romanticisation of [these] serious concepts which makes it incredibly difficult to gain the right balance

Andrew – It’s hard to prove without evidence, for both sides, the only way is DNA and witnesses.  False convictions happen less often than rape cases being ignored, but you cannot always instantly believe women because it could ruin a man’s life, but you can’t believe the man as that could ruin the life of the woman.  I don’t know what to do.

Jason – I am aware that it is something that happens. I feel like these should be made aware of.

Ryan – There are already laws in place for such things if it’s clear that the accusation is made up, prosecution for deformation of character and filing a false police report should take place but more emphasis on believing the accused more methods should really be placed into preventing rape and femicides than preventing a smaller issue crime. If those two can be resolved I am sure the fake accusations would be more clear

Betty – people should be prosecuted for fake claims 

Amelia – This is a difficult question because you get caught up between victim blaming and “innocent until proven guilty” and protecting the public. In certain cases where evidence is lacking, proving/disproving cases can be difficult. I don’t know how this issue can be overcome.

Jeffree – feel if someone files a false rape claim they should get the same punishment as what the falsely convicted [would have] due to them ruining their lives.

Brent – there is very little that can be done to prevent them without causing controversy over the fact that the rape claim could be true.


  • Do you think that tea video helps? What else could we do?

for reference, this is the video I am talking about:

James – it touches on the subject in a very joking manner, it would make more of a difference if it was presented in a very serious tone as well as [providing] information about the consequences of their actions

Daniel – it really is not serious. If you’re trying to teach kids something important, teach it to them seriously. Consent is such an important topic.

Eliza – Although it has stuck in a lot of people’s heads after seeing it, of those people a lot have clowned that video thinking it is all just a joke.

Avis – I believe it set out with the right idea, it slowly has become more of a joke than a video educating young people on a serious issue.

Bailey – It has a meaning but if people are going to be anything like us, they won’t take it seriously 

Andrew – The tea video is a good illustration, but kids look at it and don’t see the underlying message.  At the ages of 10-14 it could help, but above then, it won’t help at all and could be detrimental.  

Teresa – The tea video is awful. It is a joke in schools, and it takes away from the incredibly important subject. We should not be making jokes around the importance of this teaching. We should teach it in a way that doesn’t shy away from the message, regardless of the age. 

Jason – I do not think that the tea video helps at all because in schools it is just a joke, and it needs to be addressed more seriously.

Ryan – The tea video is awful it is not specific enough it euphemises a topic of high importance the point must be clear of the severity and the unforgivable nature of the crime. Greater sex education is required perhaps at a younger age particularly about sexual assault harassment and rape and the clear definitions of what they are as many young impressionable people may not have been aware that they have been taken advantage of

Betty – I think there needs to be more open and more frequent conversations and demonstrations about it for everyone

Harper – the tea video is confusing, especially to younger kids and makes it seem too much like a fun quirky little thing when it’s a serious issue, when they can show us scary videos for things like road safety but not rape you can tell there’s an issue. they need both hard-hitting videos and proper education on the topic, not some funny little YouTube video that they just ignore

Brent – While it is useful for getting the message across and is a national thing that everyone understands and remembers, it turns the issue into a joke.


  • What do you think about the hashtag not all men?

James – I agree as I know that a lot of men are very against any of these actions

Daniel – clearly not all men harass or rape, but the fact still remains that any man can be intimidating. Even I could be considered intimidating, so I know I need to keep that in mind. 

Eliza – I believe that it is correct. Not all men would mistreat women like some do however, because of the small amount that do, women are led to believe that all men are the same. Which in my opinion isn’t right?

Avis –I think all its doing is drowning out the women and the men who are talking about issues involving horrible men.

Bailey – I understand that not all men fit under the categories but the number of men who are involved is just too much and has become a sign of how toxic it is

Andrew – It’s factually correct, but equally, if that leads to a woman trusting all men and end up having negative experience with them, this will be detrimental in the long run 

George– it’s very true

Teresa – Yes, it isn’t all men, but it’s enough men and I believe that the men who say “it’s not all men” are the ones most likely to be misogynistic or have the ability to sexually assault as they wouldn’t feel the need to disagree if they weren’t insecure about their actions or thoughts towards women.

Jason – I understand that it isn’t All men, but the men and women who use it tend to be aggressive and seem to be part of the reason why the hate crimes exist. But I would like for the message to be given how it isn’t all men. Some look out for women, and they also want to protect those they care about.

Ryan – I think the hashtag not all men is stupid, shifting the conversation into a direction it doesn’t need to take in the first place it shows how little the majority of men care. they only begin to care when it harms their reputation. There is a distinct lack of empathy and lack of will to do what is right and the conversation must remain at the focal point of the problem preventing future generations from suffering.

Betty – I think it’s a fair point to make but it’s being overused and not always helping

Amelia – Obviously not all men are like this. We know that. The issue is that it’s ENOUGH men that it’s a serious problem. The problem is that we don’t know WHICH men and therefore feel a degree of uncertainty and fear around them all.

Harper – everyone knows the situation is not all men, no one thinks every man is a rapist or sexual assaulter, but statistically it’s enough to be scared, people are afraid of dying in a car accident, but not all cars are going to crash, and as a woman you’re more likely to die at the hands of a man then a car, so I think it’s perfectly justified to protect yourself, cause these bad men prey on the naive and vulnerable.

Brent – I think that the meaning behind the hashtag is correct in the sense that it isn’t all men but the fact that people feel the need to bring it up almost shows guilt. it shows that they care more about their reputation than the safety of women and that is disgusting.


  • What are your thoughts on victim blaming?

James – I don’t agree with blaming the victim for the actions that took place

Daniel – people who victim blame are just straight up pieces of shit. Nothing, *nothing* could possibly make the victim at fault. “They were wearing a short skirt” and? They don’t dress for you. Fuck right off.

Eliza – In my opinion, the process of victim blaming is fucked. The statement of ’she is asking for it’ makes me sick to my stomach as thinking about a woman as an object because she is wearing certain clothing.

Avis – Victim blaming is horrible. Someone has gone through something absolutely mortifying and people have the audacity blame them for what happened to them. All I can think about is “Haven’t they gone through enough?”

Andrew – Very simply, it’s one of the things which lead to court cases being dropped.  No woman is wearing a skirt with the intention to get raped that night.  She could be wearing a mini bikini with the Pornhub logo on, you do not touch that woman unless she explicitly says it’s okay.

Teresa – Victim blaming is awful. No one would ask for the trauma and PTSD that those actions lead to. No one would ask for the judgment received after people find out. No one would ask for that feeling of helplessness and disgust. Victims often blame themselves after going through that, why should you add to that.

Jason – What happens cannot be excused, and you should never blame the victim for what happened. People should be able to wear whatever they want and not be told that their outfit choice makes them a victim.

Ryan – Victim Blaming is fucking disgusting.  You wouldn’t blame the seller at a store if an armed robbery takes place, it’s no different from any other crime. support is what’s required after a crime. 

Betty – it’s awful in any circumstance

Amelia – Blaming women is absolutely ridiculous. The only people that can be blamed for rape are rapists.

Jeffree – Stupid, no one asks for it it’s stupid how people think people can ask for it 

Ana – It’s terrible because it makes the victim feel worse about the subject and like they aren’t valid.

Harper – it’s never the victim’s fault, ever, this is a traumatic event they’ve been through and to belittle that in any way it’s such an awful thing to do

Brent – victim blaming is disgusting- the person that commits the crime is the only one at fault


  • Do you think it’s in the best interest of the woman to report the assault or not? Why?

James – Yes, I do so the person in question is delt with, assuming the report for assault was genuine

Daniel – I personally think women should report their assault but I know it isn’t that easy.  I think their claims should be acknowledged, respected, taken extremely seriously and investigated and the assaulter should be punished severely. Whatever makes them the most comfortable is what’s best for them.

Eliza – Certain women that have experienced sexual assault don’t feel comfortable to share with loved ones, family or friends, let alone the police. 

Avis – Although as a society we are getting “better”, I still believe it’s really unsafe for women to talk about these things and come out about them. There will always be a person telling them it’s their own fault or giving them grief about the situation. It sucks. However, there are a lot of people out there now to help women and back them up. So maybe a better world isn’t so far away?

Bailey – It would be but again, people think they’re fake or just brush off it off so I don’t think it would always work

Andrew – It depends, in an ideal world, all rapes would get reported, all crimes would be convicted, but sadly that’s not how the world works.  If you have enough evidence, go for it 100%, if not just for you then do it for others.  If you think it will harm your mental health, then don’t do it.  It sometimes ends up with guys thinking they can get away with it, but you should to anything you can to try ensuring that you get justice.

Teresa – It often depends on the situation. 

Jason – I think that women should know that they can report it and have something come of it, but with the way it is handled currently, reporting it to the authorities is something that is entirely up to them. It needs to be addressed differently because not enough comes of it.

Ryan – I wish it was in the best interest of a woman to report an assault but often can lead to far greater backlash. But I personally think the first step toward changes in action for every voice that speaks out another may gain the confidence to do so and the clear increase in reports will require change from the police and greater intervention and prevention would take place as a result

Betty – if women reported it as much as it happens then it will open a lot of people’s eyes and help to progress a more efficient way of prosecuting and maybe even preventing

Amelia – you would also be protecting other women by having dangerous people taken off of the streets. However, going through the process of police interviews and trials and experiencing almost a guaranteed degree of victim blaming would be incredibly taxing on one’s mental health, having to relive awful experiences would be terribly traumatic.

Jeffree – I would rather they report it because they could get more assistance, but I don’t know about how much assistance there is for victims 

Ana – I think it depends on the woman feels, if she feels that she can deal with reporting it or not.

Harper – as things are currently, i think it’s always the best idea to report, but that doesn’t mean it’s at the women’s best interest. 

Brent – whether it be reporting it or telling someone you trust i think it will often be in their best interest not to keep it to themselves. while reporting it has a large chance of not resulting in any convictions, not reporting means there is no chance at all for justice.


  • Is there anything else at all you want to add?

Daniel – people should just behave with basic decency. It’s really not hard. People who do assault or rape are lowlifes who can’t be bothered to stop and think. They have no empathy and I barely consider them people to be honest.

Eliza – just a bit of advice… From a personal experience I have had, do whatever you want to do with the information that you have. Whether that is reporting it to the police, keeping it between you and your friends or telling no one. Don’t feel like you are obligated to tell anyone whatever the situation.

Avis – To conclude everything I have said, the world sucks, if time, but maybe there’s hope for us yet?

Andrew – To any guys with female friends out there: try being with them as much as possible, not because men need to protect women but because it’s far less likely and no one will hurt them or try anything.  If you’re considering it: think about it as if it was your daughter, sister, or mother that this was happening to and if you’re a girl, support other girls, don’t gang up on them.  And the educate your sons movement is a great idea – something which my opinion has changed on over the past month.

Teresa – The issue will continue unless someone does something. Whether it’s changing the curriculum to teach the impacts that actions can have or changing the process for convictions. No matter what it is, something needs to be changed.

Jeffree – More support is needed to make people more comfortable coming forward with confidence to report an issue instead of hiding it from people

Harper – I just want to say I hope people don’t let this be another trend that dies out in a week cause it’s not popular to talk about it anymore, because that happens too much


  • What questions do you have? Who for?

Daniel – what can I do as a man to make women as stress free as possible whilst going about my day-to-day life? 

Andrew – For most guys: how hard is it to be a decent human being? That’s more rhetorical but, it counts.

Teresa – for any person who has ever raped or assaulted anyone. Why? What compelled you to put a person through that?

Harper – to men who say not all men, why are you so desperate to make yourself seem so good? cause to most women it makes you seem way worse than better.

Brent – I would love to know how women feel, I have had conversations with family members about their opinions and they are as expected but a range of views would be interesting.


First of all, thank you again to everyone who helped me to write that. I know that it wasn’t easy for all of you, but you all did it and it really means so much and it was interesting to hear everyone’s take on this issue.

Thank you so much for reading this incredibly long article, I really hope that it has opened your eyes and that this is a topic which will continue to be spoken about until change finally happens permanently. Similar to the BLM movement, how many more innocent people have to die until we realise we need to make a change? Hopefully no more, but until that day comes, I’ll be here shouting from the rooftops until I go hoarse.

This is one of the hardest articles I have ever had to write, but I honestly feel so much better now that I have done it. I’ve also put so much work into it, even if it doesn’t seem like it, but thank you so much for reading. Please comment your opinions because I would really love to hear them.

Stay safe, stay kind, viva le resistance baby!! (we’re bringing that back), I love you all,

xo baby, Tati xoxo

Why Malala Yousafzai Inspires Me

For most of these articles, I need to think long and hard about my answer. However, this one came to my head without even really thinking. By far the person I look up to the most and who I hope I will meet someday is Malala Yousafzai.

When I was around 10 or 11, the book I Am Malala came out. I was in year six at the time and I didn’t know much about this woman. What I read changed my life forever.

For those of you who don’t know, Malala Yousafzai is a 23-year-old activist who spoke out against the Taliban, a radical terrorist group in Pakistan when she was only 10 years old. In an a futile attempt to silence her, she was shot in the head when she was twelve when she was on her way home from school. Being the strong person she was, she survived and managed to become the youngest Nobel Prize Laureate ever.

After reading her book, I completely re-evaluated my thoughts and feelings about so many things. Firstly, this is the book that really made me realise I was a feminist and that I wanted to change the world, and Malala made me realise I could do it. Her sheer power and resistance is something I will never stop talking about and I always hope that she knows she changed my life for the better. Secondly, she made me proud to be mixed race. Some of you have read my post about my Ethnicity, in which I spoke about Liza Koshy inspiring me to be proud about my skin colour. However, a mini turning point for me was reading this book. This strong woman who was Pakistani was standing up for what she believed in, and refused to let anyone silence her. Even after she was in fatal condition, she never stopped fighting for equality and for education for all.

This woman is such an inspiration and has shaped me to become who I am today and I desperately hope that one day I’ll be able to meet her, just to say thank you for helping me to accept myself and begin to become my best self.

I’m sorry this was rather brief, Malala is one of my biggest role models and I want people to understand that! Also, as I was writing this, I accidentally went down a bit of a Yousafzai-Spiral and it really made me realise how truly grounded this woman is, in one article I read she said all she needs right now is Netflix and Sleep and, honestly, who doesn’t! I think we can all agree that Ms Yousafzai is an absolute icon and inspiration to all young women in this world.

“If one man can destroy everything, why can’t one girl change it?”

Malala Yousafzai

Black Lives Matter – Taking a Stand From Home

Once more, the world is in a state of political unrest. Alongside the virus, there are protests happening worldwide supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. If, like me, you are unable to go out and protest, I can assure you there are ways you can support the movement. Hopefully, if we all continue to unite as we are currently, we can make this world a safe place for all – not just certain races. If you know anymore ideas or have any advice to give, please comment it. It’s about time we made some change around here and it is important that we are all as educated as possible on the matters at hand.

If you are unaware of the situation in America currently, there are protests taking place over the murder of George Floyd and the punishment of the policeman responsible for his death. These protests have begun to spread around the world and if you want to do something to show your support for the movement but are paranoid about leaving your house due to… other events, I have compiled a list of things you can do to help while staying safe and home.

  1. Remember their names. As unfortunate and horrific as it is, George Floyd is not the first instance of police brutality to a person of colour. It is so important that we remember all those who have lost their lives simply because of the colour of their skin. It’s dumfounding how many victims there are, but it’s just all the more proof that this should have been changed a long time ago. We can’t change the past, but we can at least change the future.
  2. Sign petitions. Change.org have so many petitions about this movement and it is a well trusted website which will – quite frankly – get shit done. It’s such a quick, simplistic way to make a difference and I assure you, you’ll feel so much better after you’ve done it. Sign up for updates and you can sign even more petitions.
  3. Be respectful to all those around you and the victims friends and family. Such an important one. This is definitely not the time to start an all out race war. This is the time of political movement and change. This is not the time to claim all white people have a superiority complex or that all cops are racist. This just gets you no-where and you have no evidence for your facts. Don’t accuse someone of something they have not done. We need to learn to spread love and not hate, the sooner the better.
  4. Educate yourselves. I understand that everyone has differing views on this whole protest and that’s okay, you just need to remember to learn and back up your points. If you have a differing view it’s important to educate and learn as much as you can about the situation before forming an opinion.
  5. Buy from black-owned companies and support small businesses and avoid buying from companies just profiting of others struggle. Lots of big name brands are unfortunately using this time to profit off of the racism in the world. If you want to support, yet again educate yourself on which companies you should avoid. Buying and supporting from black owned companies is a step in the right direction towards acceptance and equality.
  6. Call people out on their racist behaviour and educate them. Lots of people make jokes. That’s fine! However, some people cross the line and their “jokes” are plain offensive. It’s important that if you see a joke or comment that makes you uncomfortable, spread the word that what they’ve said or done isn’t acceptable.
  7. Boycott racist companies and influencers. In this day in age lots of companies and people are being exposed for their racist ways. The only way we can show these people and companies that it’s not okay is by not buying or promoting their products until they change their ways.
  8. Speak up and speak out If you have had a negative experience involving your race, get your story heard and share it. The more people who speak up, the better as it shows the government and those in charge that this is an actual problem.
  9. Donate to charities and causes. Yet again you’ll need to do your research, but donating as little as £1 can go a long way and you can help change the future. If you are unable to donate, then share and spread the message to show we stand together.
  10. Attending protests. I am aware this isn’t easy at all, but if you can, try your best to show up to show your support. Make sure you stay safe and healthy and go do your part.

This time isn’t easy for anyone. If we try spread support and love and raise awareness, hopefully our voices will be heard and the world will change for the better.

This is a time that will go down in history, you just need to stay safe and support others.

All the love,

Tati xx

Why I’m a Feminist

Welcome to feminist Friday’s!  Where (almost) every Friday I talk about all thing’s female empowerment and equality!  This week I need everyone to know why I’m a feminist…

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that baby to grow up with gender roles about how boys don’t cry.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that toddler to grow up thinking she needs to wait for a prince to save her.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that four-year-old to grow up being told a boy is being mean to her because he likes her.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that six-year-old to grow up being told she can’t achieve her dreams of being a sporting star because she’s a girl.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that eight-year-old to grow up hearing grown men sexualising her body because her “shorts are too short”.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that ten-year-old to grow up feeling self-conscious about her stomach size, her boob size, or her butt size.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that twelve-year-old to grow up with the trauma and PTSD of sexual assault and harassment.

I’m a feminist because I don’t want that fourteen-year-old to grow up without any form of education about consent.

I’m a feminist because I want to grow up in a world of equality and love.

I’m a feminist because I want to grow up and not be afraid of walking alone or worrying who’s lurking around the corner.

I’m a feminist because I want equal pay.

I’m a feminist because I want abuse to end.

I’m a feminist because some day I want to be up for a job promotion against a man with a similar skillset as I do and for neither of us to be discriminated against (positive or otherwise).

I’m a feminist because I’ve been waiting for the world to change my whole life.  Now it’s time to make the world change.

Questions a Feminist Gets Asked

So, if you haven’t realised by now, I’m a massive feminist.  I believe massively in equality for all and as Karen Smith says in Mean Girls the Musical “I expect to run the world in shoes I cannot walk in.”  I’m also not afraid to let others know what I believe in.  Although people are typically very lovely and agree with me (for obvious reasons) I have met – on more than one occasion people who are slightly… We’ll say confused, on what a feminist is.  This – as well as being kinda offensive – does give me great content for my blog.  Most of these made me laugh, so hopefully it’ll do the same for you!

First up – my personal favourite:

“You’d be really sexy if you weren’t a feminist.”

What?!  Firstly, that you for calling me sexy… I think?  (We were both underaged so nothing untoward was going on).  I just love it because the person who said that to me genuinely meant it as a mix of a compliment and constructive criticism.

“Is it because you can’t cook and want men to do it for you?”

This is amazing.  Fun fact about me: I cannot cook to save my life – honestly I once out something in the microwave on a plate, the plate started sparking, I took the food out and put it back in the microwave because I thought it looked cool.  I’ve burnt myself more times than imaginable because I’ll touch a tray that just came out the oven to see if it’s hot.  So, to be fair, I can imagine myself doing that.  But I’m not!  I’m doing it because… Equality!

“Do you want to become superior and have men become your slaves and worship you?”

Yes.  I’m kidding I promise – I couldn’t deal with being a dictator, there would be too much pressure 🙂

“Is it just a phase?”

It’ll be a phase until we’re all equal – respect the drip Karen.

“Do you burn your bras and shave your hair off?”

God, I could never burn a bra – do you know how expensive those things are!  And I do quite like my hair and it would take so long to grow back!

“Are you a man hater?”

No, I like men.  My Dad is someone I’ve always looked up to, and his Dad got me into Performing Arts, while my Mum’s Dad gave me his gift of being extremely extroverted and I can talk to people easily.  My little brother is a sweetheart and my Big Bro is crazy but he’s one of my closest mates.  Thumper is my best friend and he’s a dude… and we can’t forget my boyfriend who I simply adore or any of my other guy friends.  So, guys are pretty cool, I guess I’m just a society hater instead.

“Is this your way of coming out to us as gay?”

Quite simply, no.  Of course, there’s nothing wrong with being gay but I’m… not – oops.  I’m just an activist 🙂

Leading on from that last one…

“Do your parents know?”

Yes, and they’re very supportive with the fact I want equality for all 🙂

                Finally, this is a question I get asked lots and I want to clear it up once and for all.  “If you’re a feminist, why do you dress like a slut?” Because I should be allowed to wear whatever the hell I want and not be put down for it!  If someone posts a photo of them in a crop top and a mini skirt, I just want you to know you look amazing and I have an insane amount of respect for you.  If someone posts a photo in a hoodie and joggers, I want you to know you look amazing and I respect you. 

At the end of the day, let’s just respect one another and not put anyone else down.  Is that fair?  Okay, good!  Thank you for reading this article, I’m sorry for posting so frequently, I’ve just had my creativity flowing and I’m motivated to write and share!

Love you all, xo baby Tati xoxo

Feminist Playlist

This has been highly requested, it took a while, but we have it now!  I’ve compiled a playlist of 23 songs which my Instagram followers and I class as “Feminist Anthems” I have no doubt this playlist will grow as time goes on but below are 23 songs we all thought gave us that fighting feeling.

I Don’t Need Your Love – Six the Musical  

Sassy, fun and overall proof that self-love is the best love!


Six – Six the Musical

It’s just all of Henry VIII’s ex-wives singing about being kickass, what more could you want?!


The Man – Taylor Swift

All about female vs male representation in the media, also just a bop™


I See Stars – Mean Girls the Musical

“You could make diamonds dull, you are so beautiful” is something I quote daily.


Love is a Battlefield – Pat Bentar

I love this song for two reasons.  The first: my Mum introduced me to this banger, the second: the music video is the most iconic thing.  It’s so eighties but has a very sweet message.


I’d Rather Be Me – Mean Girls the Musical

This song has it all.  Going against stereotypes?  Check.  Being sarcastic?  Check.  Swearing at those who’ve stabbed you in the back?  Check.  Strong vocals and catchy tune?   Check, check, check!!


Heart of Stone – Six the Musical

“You can build me up, you can tear me down, you can try but I’m unbreakable.” Is what I told myself while going into school everyday last year


Sexy – Mean Girls the Musical

“This is modern feminism talking, I expect to run the world in shoes I cannot walk in!” Need I say more?


This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things – Taylor Swift

Cute and good message. That’s all.


Bad Blood – Taylor Swift

The videos with Taylor Swift girl gang. I remember watching it when I was younger and just wishing I was a part of that.


I Lived – One Republic

It may not be by a female artist but the message is still the same uplifting one.


Fight Song – Rachel Platten

It’s a feminist anthem, need I say more?


Just a Girl – No Doubt

Gwen Stephani, a feminist queen.


Girls Like Girls – Hayley Kiyoko

An LGBT and feminist anthem which shows you that you sometimes need to break the rules and cross the lines.


Run the World (Girls) – Beyoncé

It. Is. A. Feminist. Anthem.


I Will Survive – Gloria Gaydor

“Do you think I’d lay down and die? Oh no not I”


I’m Coming Out – Diana Ross

This song shows you girls can go out and have fun, in a glamour-filled way!


The Best Day – Taylor Swift

A sweet message and whenever I hear this song I think about my Mum.


Fearless – Mean Girls the Musical

Stand up to those bullies and toxic friends!


Shake It Off – Taylor Swift

Just dance to it. Dance to it and feel your troubles burn faster than the calories


You Need To Calm Down – Taylor Swift

Another LGBTQ+ anthem “and we see you over there on the internet, comparing all the girls who are killing it.”


Girls Just Wanna Have Fun – Cyndi Lauper

We also just wanna have fundamental rights but you know.